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Balearic population stands at over a million

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Balearic population

 

Balearic Islands

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Over the past decade the British population in the Balearics has more than doubled, according to data published by the National Statistics Institute (INE) yesterday

In 2001, there were 10’850 British residents registered with their town halls living in the Balearics, at the beginning of last year, that figure stood at 23’606.

And, while there were 36’395 Germans registered as Balearic residents, the growth in the size of the German community over the past ten years has been slightly slower than that of the British.

There has also been a substantial increase in the number of registered French and Italian residents.

Balearic inhabitants

In total, there are now 120’847 European Union citizens registered as Balearic residents.
New EU members such as Poland, Rumania and Bulgaria can not be gauged because they were not members of the EU in 2001.
But, for example, there are now 4’253 Poles living in the Balearics along with 12’665 Rumanians, nearly 2’000 more than the number of Britons living here back in 2001.

The total population of the Balearics stood at 1’113’114 at the start of last year.
Of those, 842, 289 were born in Spain and the remaining 270’825, overseas.
But, of those born in Spain, only 53.6% were born here in the Balearics, the rest were born elsewhere on mainland Spain or in the Canary Islands.
The population figures, especially when they come to the European Union community, are not, however, finite.
There are many more second home owners who are not registered with their town halls, so the figures for some nationalities could be higher.
And, while there has been an exodus of non-European Union citizens back to their countries of origin, especially those from South America, because of the recession and the lack of jobs, European Union citizens continue to be lured by the Spanish lifestyle and the drop in house prices.

Recent reports indicate that the strong Pound and the attractive property prices are fueling a recovery in the UK market with an increase in Britons considering moving to Spain.

source :majorcadailybulletin

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